Sabrina Gordon

Sabrina Gordon

Sabrina Schmidt Gordon has been committed to cultural and social issues documentary filmmaking for over a decade. Her editing debut garnered an Emmy for WGBH’s Greater Boston Arts series, and she has continued to distinguish herself as both a producer and editor through her work on numerous award-winning programs for public television and cable.

Sabrina is the co-producer and editor of Mrs. Goundo’s Daughter, a Sundance Institute/ ITVS documentary about a young Malian mother’s quest to protect her baby daughter from female genital cutting. It premiered nationally at the Silverdocs Film Festival in June 2009, where it was nominated for an award in the Sterling U.S. Competition. Most recently, Mrs. Goundo’s Daughter has also been shown at a Congressional Hearing on asylum and at the World Economic Forum. She is also the co-producer and editor of Hip-Hop: Beyond Beats and Rhymes, a groundbreaking PBS documentary about manhood and gender politics in mainstream Hip- Hop. Named in MSNBC’s The Griot’s “Ten Most Important Black Films of the Decade,” and featured on the Chicago Tribune’s “Best Documentaries of 2007,” the film premiered to rave reviews and sold out shows at the Sundance Film Festival, and continues to be screened in classrooms throughout the country. She has two projects in development—The Good Fight of Malik Rahim, about the incredible journey of the activist and former Black Panther, including his daunting mission to save the Lower Ninth Ward section of New Orleans; and 180 Days, which examines the NYC Teaching Fellows Program through the eyes of three new teachers during their first year in the public school system.

Sabrina’s commitment to social justice extends to creating video for nonprofits, and fostering partnerships between filmmakers and activists. She is the founder of The Engage Media Project, a resource for filmmakers, educators and activists to partner, share information and create engagement and educational outreach campaigns. She is a new media producer and editor on The Masculinity Project—an ambitious web-based initiative of the National Black Programming Consortium (NBPC) that explores masculine identity in the Black community, and The Haiti Project—NBPC’s online portal of stories told by Haitian survivors following the 2010 earthquake. Other organizations she has worked with include Witness, Agricultural Missions, the Center for Constitutional Rights, TruthAIDS and the National Campaign to Restore Civil Rights.

Sabrina is also a documentary filmmaking instructor, having guest lectured at Brooklyn College, New Jersey City University, the Independent Filmmaker Project, Reel Works, and the Jacob Burns Film Center. She is an honors graduate from New York University’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study.